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"Culture and Community"

I’ve been a member of MM Team Fitness for 3 yrs and continue to team train for a number of reasons. One, I want to be a strong and fit 50-year old in the best shape of her life. Two, I find the programming and coaching second to none. I have friends that spend more time and money in the gym, or with a trainer, and are getting nowhere near the results. The high intensity, constantly varied aspect of what we do presents never ending challenges and keeps me motivated when my alarm goes off at 5:15 am, or when I’m fighting rush hour traffic on my way across town to get to the gym. Most importantly, it’s downright fun. I mean Monkey Bars and Rope climbs at age 50! You bet.

Three, the programming fits my busy work and family schedule, and budget. I simply don’t have the time to be in the gym or pay for a trainer every day. Aside from a little fun cardio once in a while, I get everything I need from my regular 3 day a week sessions.

Overall though, the best aspect of MM Team training is the culture of like-minded professionals that it attracts. People that all come together to participate and simply be successful. I’ve met so many great people and have made many friendships by being a part of MM Team Fitness. It’s what really keeps me coming back. My teammates inspire and support me. They challenge me to work harder – do another rep, add another plate, run a little faster, row harder or put more weight over my head. It’s this amazing group of people all working together toward a common goal of life transformation that keeps me coming back for more. It’s a true sense of community, a unique blend of social yet focused training that you’d be hard-pressed to find in any other club or exercise setting.

– Kathy Clarke

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"The journey began 18 months ago and 50+ pounds fatter."

The motivation, tired of being fat and out of shape. No specific goal, just learned to eat clean, be consistent with exercise and keep it enjoyable. Audrey benches 135 x 5 x 3 at a bodyweight of 143 at 20% body fat. Started run training in mid-May to improve upon her 2:09 1/2 time. After about 6 weeks of two day a week run training (one day intervals on the tread, and one long run outside on weekends) she can run 8 mi at an RPE of 12. A pace that in May during her VO2max test was an RPE of 15. She could only hold 8.5 mph for one minute at VO2max in May, now runs 5 sets of 4 min intervals at 8.5 mph. No specific goal, just faster than 2:09 and still be able to maintain her 135 x 5 x 3 bench. Based on RPE, she's currently on track for a sub 1:55 1/2. We'll see what happens in Oct.

Setbacks, spent several days in the hospital in early June for an ulcer that reminded her that NSAIDs are not for every little ache and pain. About a week without solid food, bounced back quickly. Full-time job, stress, two active kids in sports, busy schedule, lots of potential excuses to deviate from healthy eating and/or inconsistent training, but doesn't because its a lifestyle. Another perk, she now feels comfortable in a bikini, in public that helps to keep it enjoyable and being consistent!

 

 

 

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CrossFit and Type I Diabetes by Mike Hoge

After adjusting his diet and learning how to deal with diabetes after hard workouts, Hoge finished 53rd in the Open in the South Central Region, and he bettered that placing by finishing 29th at the Regional. His success was a confirmation that diabetes is not going to dominate his life.

MP4 version video
wmv version video

 

 

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Greg Hicks, age 58 has been running for over 37 years. He has run numerous marathons, ½’s and other events. In June 2011 he decided to join MM Team Fitness to work on his flexibility and strength to further his running performance, decrease injury risk, and make each event more enjoyable. 

Over the past 2 years he’s made considerable progress in all areas of fitness. What is particularly impressive is that he’s done very little running this past year (about 35 mi total) and no cycling for about 2 years, yet has maintained a high level of generalized physical preparedness (GPP) through high intensity power training 3d/wk for both modes of exercise. 

On May 4th he ran the Cincy Flying Pig ½ with his future son-in-law and friends for fun (not for time he emphasized), a leisurely jog at 10:27 pace, still faster than 53% of those in his category and faster than the race average. Greg’s typical ½ time is about 2 hrs (Cincy 2010 and 2011 events) and he reminds Cap City runners that High Street is not a hill. The following week (May 11th) he rode one leg of TOSRV (Columbus to Portsmouth), 105 miles on an early 1980’s Nishiki steel tubing clunker with shifters on the stem (averaged about 15 mph). Total prep for event, 0 miles. Did it for fun and felt he could have done the full event. 

Greg was back in the gym for his regular workout on Tues following both events, a quick recovery, no drama. Given how well he’s done with little to no preparation, going forward he’s decided to include some specific run/cycle training for these events. His goal is a 1:45 ½ and a 3:50 full, but now its kayak season and because this is about enjoying the experience, his focus will be on the water.  

As his trainer I want to be clear here, I am not suggesting that 3d/wk of High Intensity Power Training is enough to be competitive in running, cycling or other endurance event; one has to put in the miles to prepare the body and physiological systems for the task. However one has to ask, if a growing number of participants are able to run or cycle in these events for fun and without formal training, yet post better times than over ½ that specifically train for these events, is there a better way to train for running, cycling or other athletic endeavors? Are we becoming too specific with our training? Doing more of the same and getting less out of it? It’s evident not only in adults but our young athletic population. We encourage them to compete in one or more sporting events, sometimes year round, hire specialty coaches, spend hours on skill training, but do little if any strength and conditioning or GPP to provide a solid foundation for optimal performance and injury prevention. Something to think about when doing more to get better, yields little or no improvement coupled with a higher incidence of injuries.

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Last Saturday, Audrey and I were discussing her running prep for the Fall 1/2 and at one point in the discussion the topic of our current training format came up. It started with, "I hated this stuff when we first started." From there she was off on a 5 min rant. When she was done I told her to put what she said in few paragraphs for a blog piece as it's important for both current and future clients. Here it is.

About 3 years ago we transitioned from old school body building style lifting to the current Cross Fit based training system. I wasn’t happy about it, in fact I hated it, I mean really hated it. It was everything I couldn’t do.

I am not a coordinated person and suddenly I was asked to perform these moves that required core strength and stability, speed, eye/hand coordination, mobility, use of my whole body, balance and mental discipline. I no longer just stood there and moved a weight up and down or back and forth. The focus wasn’t just one body part, it was everything at once and if I didn’t do something right especially with a kettlebell, it hurt.

Functional high intensity power training took me out of my comfort zone and what I knew. Now I had to actually think about what I was doing. Gone were the days when I could come in, sit on the lat pull down machine and feel good about just doing a set or moving more weight.

I struggled from day one and I would leave many times feeling like a failure because I couldn’t get my head wrapped around a movement or I ended up on my butt trying to clean the bar. Words like clean and jerk were foreign, and how many different foot and hand positions are there anyway? I couldn’t do a headstand, I would fall over trying to get my 2nd leg rested on my elbow because I was inflexible. I couldn’t get a foot off the ground trying the climb the rope because I was fat and uncoordinated. I couldn’t grasp the concept of how my feet were supposed to wrap around the bottom of the rope or how I could use my legs to climb. Worst of all, I was constantly being reminded about correct form and technique. Gone were the days of, “give me 10 reps” and that was it, nothing else to consider, didn’t matter how I did it, just get it done.

Despite all of this, I believed in my trainer and the new system. I was told this would get me in the best shape of my life, so I kept working on what I couldn’t do until I could do it.

No accomplishment was too small because each accomplishment is a stepping stone toward continued improvement. Now I can easily climb the rope while wearing a weight vest and I can do handstand pushups. I know the proper grip and stance for bar cleans, and I understand the difference between a push press and a jerk. I am elated that I can finally do things I once thought were impossible. It took me 3 years to get to this point.

Now, I can’t imagine going back to the way we used to lift, I’d be bored out of my mind performing brainless exercises. For as many struggles as I had in the beginning and still face, the progress and the results keep me moving forward. My flexibility is far better than it’s been in years. I carry more lean muscle than I ever have in my life, and my overall energy and endurance is greatly improved.

I’ve lost almost 50 lbs of fat since Feb 2012, ran the Cap City ½ marathon on May 4th, 2013 in 2:09 min, about 20 minutes faster than the COL ½ in October 2012, total miles of run training for the event, 6 miles, yes just 6 miles. One short run the weekend before. I ran faster than others I know who followed traditional running programs. I can row 500 m on the C2 Rower in 1:37, push a 200 lb plate stack up and down a 60’ isle in less than 22 seconds, and I bench 135 lbs for 12 reps. I can do handstands with my 12-year-old’s cheerleading troop while other parents just sit and stare.

I am far better off physically and mentally because of my training, yet far from where I want to be. There is always a move I struggle to get or something new that requires multiple attempts to execute reasonably well.

This hasn’t been at all easy. I am not genetically gifted nor am I athletic by nature. I work full time, live a distance from the gym and have a family and real life. Just getting to the session 3 days a week is a task in itself. I added in two days a week of run training, one interval and one longer run consistently since June 2013. In October of 2013 I ran the COL 1/2 marathon in 1:52:46. Regardless of the outcomes going forward, I continue to enjoy the journey.

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Cyndy Youker, age 56, has been training with MM Team Fitness® for 6 weeks and has lost 5 lbs to date. In addition to Team training 3d/wk, she runs 12 – 15 miles total, spread over 3 days. Consumes between 1700 and 2000 kcal/d and does some biking on the weekends for fun. Cyndy came to me with some previous resistance training background. Her initial assessment was unremarkable and was ready to go with Team training. She’s only missed one session to coach her Lacrosse team out-of-state. She always gives 100% effort to every workout and walks through the door in the morning with her game face on. Most importantly, she created a plan, a process that addressed upfront, all the variables that would ensure success relative to her goals, and she is sticking to the plan. Below is her story, how it all began. 

This all started when I met  Dr Jackie Buell at a nutrition seminar that Ohio State hosted for endurance athletes, advertised through my FrontRunner running group.  What she had to say about nutrition and portion control, hit a chord with me and I asked her if I could make an appointment to review my eating habits. 

We met, and she evaluated my typical dietary intake and offered a more balanced approach that I've been following pretty much since then.  I'm eating smaller portions more frequently throughout the day, and my eating plan is balanced - carbs, protein, fat, and include all the food groups. 

At first I thought I'd be starving - portions seemed so small! Now I can't believe how much I was eating at each meal previously! Because I am eating more often throughout the day, I don’t ever really struggle with being hungry. 

During our meeting Jackie recommended that I also get an iDXA to assess my body fat and bone density.  Based on the results, she recommended that I work with MM Team Fitness® to improve my bone density and get me in better shape (lose fat and gain muscle). The rest is history.  

One of my goals includes running a full marathon in October and the recent VO2max test at OSU was helpful in establishing some training parameters and my pace at anaerobic threshold. 

My focus is to improve my body composition, endurance and strength (less fat and more muscle) and cardiovascular conditioning. 

I'm really happy with my progress thus far, and I like the workouts, even though they are tough, because I know they are doing me good.  Plus it's nice to be working out hard with other people who want to be fit (or are fit!). The Team training is definitely motivating.

- Cyndy Youker

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A client recently emailed and asked, “Is it possible I’m getting bigger but not fatter?”

My response was, “it’s very possible. You have to get serious with dieting because you respond well to training (add muscle), if you don't start working on the fat loss, you won't get smaller.

I get this question primarily from clients that are carrying excess body fat who begin training and find their already tight clothes getting even tighter. It lends well with the myths surrounding training programs and diets for women in particular, that being women should lift light weights, perform high reps and do lots of cardio. From a trainer’s perspective, that’s easy money because you don’t have to change their behavior and mindset, and there are no performance metrics. It fits with all the misinformation out there on the internet and, well it’s easy. Who wants to lift hard if it’s only going to make them bigger? The hidden downside for the client is you have to spend a lot of time in the gym lifting light weights and doing cardio to maintain the smaller size. At some point, life (work and family) gets in the way and one slowly gains the weight back because the program is unsustainable, ending up with less muscle and more fat than when they started. There is a big difference between what happens in the first 6 months versus the next couple of years of a health and fitness transformation program. Short-term change is easy, long-term maintenance is not.

Now let’s examine the reality side. As illustrated in the picture of fat versus muscle, pound for pound, fat is less dense than muscle (occupies more volume per unit mass). Lose 5 pounds of fat and gain 5 pounds of muscle, no change in scale weight and you’ll lose inches, simply mind boggling! Moreover, you’ll increase your metabolism (burn more calories a day without even having to move) and possess more metabolically active tissue (good for disposing blood glucose), and muscle gives the body shape. A skinny-fat may look good in clothes, but naked or in a swimsuit, ummmm, no. Losing muscle is easy, losing fat is not.

Many of my female clients don't experience huge changes on the scale yet they are down 2 – 4 sizes, and they always look lighter than they really are. Ask yourself, would you rather have someone say you look 145 when you weigh 130, or someone say you look 130 when you weight 145? Let’s be honest, we are not self-conscious about our weight because it matters to us per se, but how we think others perceive us based on a number. Really, it is just a number, like comparing fit subjects to unfit subjects using BMI, same BMI big difference in how one looks, functions, and scores on risk factors for CVD, diabetes and certain cancers.

Remember, one doesn’t get fat overnight, nor is one going to lose the fat overnight, it takes time. Build the muscle, increase the metabolism and get your dietary intake in line with a maintainable fat loss and a realistic endpoint. Genetics and life will dictate the final outcome. Stray too far from your genetic set point and you’ll snap back hard. If you add muscle easily, accept it, if you struggle to lose fat, keep at it and be realistic. Accept who you are and stop trying to be someone else.

Leave “I think”, “I believe” and “I feel”, out of the decision making process when it comes to health and fitness goals. Base your exercise and dietary choices on scientific fact, and use measureable outcome variables (QOL/ADLs, iDXA/Bod Pod, VO2max and performance times, strength and endurance, and flexibility testing) to assess progress. You’ll be less likely to make poor choices or get sucked into programs that may provide short term emotional resolution but end up being longer-term problems.

Lastly, before you judge the merits of a program, ask yourself, are you really doing what it takes to change, are you following the program as prescribed or modifying based on feeling, thinking and believing? Excuses and inconsistency with diet and/or exercise will not help you achieveyour health and fitness goals. You may think, feel or believe you're doing enough to change, but in reality, you are not.

You can lie about the numbers, but the numbers don't lie.

 

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Posted by on in Main

Getting her head straight and getting results.

On occasion, I have a client that comes to me and complains about their lack of progress. This usually follows a Bod Pod or continued poor performance with certain exercises that others are excelling at. I know the program works because the vast majority of my clients are highly successful despite spending only 3d/wk in the gym with their teams. They even do better than some who spend twice that amount of time in the gym.

Bottom line: You get out of it, what you put into it. We do less volume (days in the gym) and higher intensity, the program is designed for people on a budget with busy lives. I provide guidance and resources, it’s up to the client to listen and facilitate. The two primary factors that limit performance are diet (daily intake, meal timing, macro composition, etc.) and consistent training.

Tara’s story below echoes what I tell every client that isn’t making progress and what happens when they stop making excuses.

Pregnancy, coupled with a miserably poor diet and very little physical activity, had me returning to MM Team Fitness in August 2012, after a two year absence, in the worst shape of my life.Although I really wanted to make a change and get control of my health and fitness, I was very inconsistent for the first 6 months.I found it easy to make excuses for why I “couldn’t” make it to the workouts; I wanted to get home and see my daughter (I had just left her for the first time to go back to work), I was tired, needed to fix dinner, just didn’t feel like it, sort of didn’t feel well, etc…A couple of months in I also had a frustrating reoccurrence of a shoulder injury that didn’t make getting to the workouts any easier.The result was that every time I stepped foot in the gym it felt like I was starting over again.Nothing was getting easier – nothing was improving – I basically had nothing to show for my “efforts.”

One thing that I was doing consistently was asking Mark why I wasn’t seeing any changes. I mean, I knew I wasn’t doing great but, c’mon, I was doing more than I was before, shouldn’t I see something for my troubles? (I should also mention that I had not really done anything at that point to change my eating habits in any meaningful way.) So, week after week, I would show up (sometimes), make healthier diet choices (occasionally), and ask Mark the same question – when am I going to see some results? And, week after week, he would respond with the same answer - when you start making it to your workouts consistently 3 days a week and get control of your diet.

I finally came to the realization that the way things were going just wasn’t working for me. I was tired of feeling like I was just trying to survive the workouts. I was tired of not seeing any results.I was tired of being fat and unhappy! I read something somewhere that really struck me – If it is important you will find a way.If it isn’t, you will find an excuse. This really defined where I was and the decision that I needed to make. How important was this to me and what was I going to do about it? So, I started showing up, without fail, to every workout giving it 100% and I started making real, meaningful changes to the way I was eating (including a pre-workout and recovery snack). I also, at Mark’s suggestion, had my Vitamin D levels checked.It turns out I was very low, so I now take a 1000 IU supplement every day.

The result has been consistent forward progress – finally! I no longer feel like I am just trying to survive the workouts.I am no longer in the vicious cycle of making a little progress only to lose it by missing workouts. Now, every time I workout, I am building upon the efforts of all of my previous workouts. I am stronger.I have more energy. I am getting smaller (and people are starting to notice)!!!!I even stayed consistent through another injury. I did what I could while it healed, and found that I didn’t really lose any momentum. I still have a long way to go to my final goal, and I still have those moments when I just want it all to happen NOW!, but I simply have a little chat with Mark and he reminds me to be patient.If I keep doing all the right things then it will happen. I see the amazing results that Mark has posted of some of his other clients and I finally, for the first time, feel like that can be me.

- Tara

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Mark asked me to write a paragraph about my “success” and journey as a new client. I thought, ok, when I feel successful, I will. Tuesday was the first day I was able forego additional band assistance on the chin up machine. No one other than Mark seemed to notice. But it brought a big smile to my face. A small success, but success none the less and it goes much further.

When things get out of control in my life, the first thing I usually give up is my work out routines.  I have gained 30 lbs over the past year.  To say that my life has been out of control, is an understatement. Over the past year and a half, out of nowhere and without warning, my husband and my baby girl developed Crohns; my son has been going through a nasty divorce; my oldest daughter developed endometrial cancer, has undergone a hysterectomy, chemo, and radiation; and then a lump in her breast was recently discovered. Lastly, my step daughter, at the age of 38, passed away this past January from liver failure leaving behind her 5 young children.  My thriving, healthy, family… all of a sudden I was hit with not one, but a multitude of health and life, issues.

In addition to working fulltime, I am in school studying for my BSN in nursing. The amount of stress is something that I cannot put into words.  More than once, I have considered dropping out of both school and MM Team Fitness. Through Marks encouragement, I continue to show up, and have been showing up, missing a session when I absolutely have to.  Given my track record of ditching workouts when the going gets tough, I would have to say that my continued attendance is my real success story.

MM Team Fitness has a true passion for seeing their clients achieve success, and their passion has helped me to stay focused on what I need to do to become a healthier person.  The fact that I am no longer in need of “bands” on the pull up machine is a small success compared to others around me, but shows what can happen with consistency.  As far as offering advice to others, just keep coming, AND “know your limitations!” Just one of MM Team Fitness mantras! When I first started, I thought if I worked harder, things would happen faster. The result of this was a knee injury and a great deal of pain. Ice, motrin, rest and eventually injections finally got me back to feeling normal again.  Start out within your limits, stay consistent, and don’t rush things…. It will happen.

Oh yeah, I've lost weight and feel better too!

 

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In March, Lisa had emailed and asked for a phone consult regarding a return to team training. She had to drop out for urgent dental work in December of 2012. She returned to training last week. During the phone conversation she explained why she wanted to return. I asked her to summarize what she told me in her own words as it gets to the heart of what MM Team Fitness is about. Often times it is not apparent until someone is out of the program for a period of time and upon their return, find their former teammates way ahead of them in all aspects of fitness. It also underscores the direction of the industry, that being group functional training and why it is and will be the future industry growth model of personal fitness coaching, aside from specialized training (hardcore powerlifting, bodybuilding, OL, sports specific, etc.).

 

Hello Mark,

I wanted to take just a minute to let you know it is great to be back training with you and the MM Teams. Although my several month layoff was unavoidable it brought a few things to light in terms of just how important and exceptional Team training is.

First, the team structure of your groups is not easily reproducible. There is something about the energy that happens when your like-minded team members gather to train together. You create an atmosphere of "internal competition" and then encourage the achievement of each individual's goals through the team. So, while the goals are my own, the team has been instrumental, I believe, in helping me to reach them.

Secondly, it is unrealistic for me to be able to continue to develop "constantly varied, functional and high intensity" workouts on a weekly basis for myself and still do everything I need to do in my "real life."

Finally, and not to minimize the financial component that is inherent in all committed fitness and health activities, but it is almost silly for me to assess the "value" of the training. Your commitment to the client and to the integrity of the workouts and to the ultimate results of your teams is remarkable and your efforts tireless.

Thanks for welcoming me back to the group.

- Lisa

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What's on the surface doesn't always reflect what is under the skin.

Danae asked that I keep this short and science based, primarily as support for others that anything can be done within reason over time, with vision and discipline. In other words, if this turns into the classic Facebook BS, "Oh Danae, I'm sooooo sorry you have to deal with this, blah, blah, blah......", I’ll delete the comments. Questions you may ask, offering sympathy you may not.

Danae has been working with MM Team Fitness for many years. About a year ago aside from the regular BS in her life that we all deal with on one level or another, the physical and psychological implications of her worsening scoliosis were becoming evident. In short, her medical specialist told her to lose weight and take up non-weight bearing water aerobics. Lose weight OK, take up water aerobics? Not a chance, maybe for some cardio, as a substitute for high intensity power training, no.

Danae was devastated with the recommendation. Certainly others welcome a reason to do something less physically demanding. For Danae, who spent time at the Olympic Training Center early in life, is wired for physical challenges and competition, and has no interest in being in a scooter by age 55, there had to be another way. She thought I would drop her as a client, or wouldn’t be able to hang with her hard core team, or be able to temper her competitive expectations without injury, oh the drama!

After the initial emotional thunderstorm passed and with further discussion with her docs, Danae decided to continue on with high intensity power training, with modifications (exclude or modify certain movements) and weigh restrictions (axial loading).

A year later, pushing 45 yrs of age, she’s down almost 30 lbs, performance is exceptional, carries about 100 lbs of lean mass on her 64 inch frame and most importantly, her overall bone density is one SD above the mean for both young and age-matched as measured by the iDXA at OSU. You get out of it what you put into it.

I attached a non-diagnostic image from the iDXA, it gives a pretty clear picture of Danae’s spine, you get the idea. Looking at her, you’d never know what’s going on under the surface.

Key take away here, as Louie Simmons would say, there are no quick fixes. Danae thanks me for working with her and I thank her for sticking with it.

Like so many of my other long-term clients, sticking with it is what makes the difference. Sometimes it takes years to finally build a base of strength and skill to turn the corner and step into the world of excellence. Quit before you get there, and you never will.

Danae can comment on any other specifics or questions. 

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A client asked me to write a blog based on their questions, this was sent to me on my RS Form Feedback for members.

Q1: Have you ever thought about posting something on how you or trainers and coaches in general get their motivation to do what they tell their clients to do? You motivate us all the time, keep us on our toes, keep us safely improving on our goals and PR's, encourage us, and yell at us both workout and nutrition wise.

A1: I can’t speak for other trainers. What motivates me is watching my clients respond to the program in a positive fashion and teamwork, tells me what I am doing is working and providing leadership. The outcomes may involve strength, power, body composition, mobility, endurance, cardiovascular fitness, improvement in some aspect of QOL or ADLs, better form or technique, almost anything that they come to me for that requires improvement, whether they realize it or not. For example, being able to squat deep without bending over, rounding the back, heels coming off the floor or knees moving way out in front of the toes. How many people even think about that and the consequences of not being able to properly perform a deep squat? Do you think they associate their lower back problems or knee problems with tight hips/ankles? Seeing that happen in someone that came to me in with the flexibility of a sun dried 2 x 4 is profound, or a client being able to perform a solid pushup, chest to floor off their toes without the spine taking on the shape of an S-hook. Seems pretty simple, but very few new clients can execute a simple pushup without their head drooping, lumbar spine collapsing and scapular winging. Client success is more than making their biceps bigger or waistline smaller.

 Q2: How do you stay on track when you are in the gym doing workouts by yourself or nutritionally - do you ever have days that you eat things that aren't that great and won't enhance your performance in the gym or in life?

A2: Never, I always eat carefully, balancing my energy intake with output to perfection, every workout is awesome. The rest of my life is perfect as well, 8 hours of sleep a night, no stress and lots of recreation and vacation time.

A2a: (non-Facebook) It is a constant struggle just like everyone else. Any trainer that tells you otherwise is full of it or they don’t have many clients and are independently wealthy. My clients don’t pay me to hear about my problems, they pay me to solve theirs.

One point that is pounded in at club industry seminars is to never promote your accomplishments. Aside from the business essentials, no one cares how much weight you lost as a trainer, how much muscle you added with your own techniques, how far you’ve thrown a javelin, how many plastic trophies you have on your mantle or what you look like in a swimsuit. Clients are only concerned with what the trainer/coach can do for them. When I see a trainer’s bio with the word “I” used repeatedly, well you might as well pay a chimp at the zoo for advice.  The vast majority of people willing to part with their hard earned money are looking for someone to help transform their lives, not rent a friend or be someone’s ogling groupie because they have 20” biceps or washboard abs. Just because someone is good at a particular sport personally doesn’t mean they are a good coach.

Q3: Accountability just being in a group setting is key for me and I believe a lot of others that are part of MM Team Fitness feel like same about that accountability aspect. How do you do it for yourself and how do you keep motivated to get what you need in order to give us what we need?

Whenever I feel weak minded or whiny, with regard to anything especially food or skipping a training session, I remind myself of one of several principles I live by. Never ask of others what you are unwilling to do yourself. I can’t ask my clients to watch what they eat and be consistent with training if I am unwilling to do the same for myself.

Q4: Who supports the Coach?

A4: You do.

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3 x 1 min rounds (Total Reps x KB mass)/BMI = Index

Name

Index

Eddie

327.5

Jon K (UF)

304.8

Danae

232.7

Matt

230.8

Bill

227.3

Nate

214.8

Chris A

208

Ryan

201.7

Dave O

194.3

Chris G

189.5

Alan

186.5

Cindy

186

Pam

175

Chris M

167.5

Lew

164

Jeff

161

Kathy

158.7

Evan

158.5

Scott W

156.8

Dan

156.6

Carolyn

156.2

Audrey

155.8

Chris K

148.3

Shawn

147.8

Scott G.

145.2

Greg

137

Veronica

133.9

Mark D

133.5

Robin

133.5

Teri

131.3

Tom

129.3

Brenda

128.1

Kishore

128

Mike P

125.8

Joe

122.5

Heidi

118.6

Jami O

107.5

Cyndy

104.2

Steph

102.7

Judy

100.8

Michele

86.4

Robbie

83.7

Jaime

72.8

Kirti

68.8

Bob

62.2

Jen A.

60.8

Tara

59.6

Irene

55.7

Cathy

55.4

Addy

53.2

Tera

32.1

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Avg Watts (1 min x 2 rounds)/lb body mass

Way to go Jeff, not bad for a guy that now two kids can call Grandpa. Thus far the ladies have 4 out of the top ten spots.

Name Power Index
Chris A 2.56
Jeff 2.48
Audrey 2.38
Nate 2.37
Jon (LBP) 2.24
Kathy 2.22
Dan 2.15
Eddie 2.14
Cindy 2.14
Teri 2.13
Kishore 2.08
Lew 2.06
Rob 1.95
Bill G 1.93
Chris M (Bike) 1.85
Jackie 1.82
Gary 1.81
Greg 1.78
Tod W. 1.75
Carolyn 1.71
Mark O 1.67
Susan 1.65
Heidi 1.62
Sarah 1.61
Kirti 1.55
Jaime 1.5
Marlene 1.46
Steph 1.45
Pam 1.41
Max 1.41
Scott G. 1.4
Sue 1.4
Cyndy 1.39
Chris K (DNP) 1.36
Robbie 1.34
Judy 1.32
Tricia 1.26
Jami (Bike) 1.17
Robin 1.17
Cathy 1.13
Addy (Bike) 1.03
Trese 0.97
Irene 0.88
Bob 0.82

 

 

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[(DB wt x 2) x (reps x 2 sets)]/BMI

DB OH AWUW. Number two, and three out of the top 10 are women. Average age of the top twelve is 45 yrs.

Name/Age

Index

Matt/46

148

Audrey/37

146

Gary/50

137.4

Cindy/46

130

Chris A/39

124

Kathy/49

118.7

Jon/39

118.6

James/49

117.8

Ryan/28

133.3

Jeff/52

109.5

Danae/44

109

Scott G/58

108.5

Lew/47

102.3

Jackie

100.9

Carolyn

100.9

Misty

96.5

Mark O

96

Dan

96

Heidi

75.2

Max

71.9

Teri

71.7

Brenda

70.1

Mark D

69

Steph

68.5

Jami

64.9

Kishore

62.2

Veronica

60.2

Sue

54

Marlene

53.8

Robin

52

Addy

44.9

Robbie

44.5

Bonnie

39.4

Trese

37.6

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[(Plate Mass/BMI)/(seconds/100)]

The higher the score the better.

Name

Index

Dan

45.4

Jeff

41.1

Chris A

41.1

Ryan C

40.1

Alan

37

Bill G

36.9

Matt

36.2

Evan

35.9

Bill C

34.1

Audrey

34

Chris K

33.3

Kathy

33

Nate

32.8

Mike P

30.8

Tod W

30.4

James

30.1

Chris M

27.5

Scott G

27.3

Tom

27

Dave

26.4

Cindy

26.3

Jackie

26.2

Kishore

24.9

Teri

24.9

Misty

24.5

Tia

22.9

Robbie

22.8

Heidi

22.7

Veronica

22.3

Carolyn

22.2

Mark D

20.5

Kristy

20.5

Eric

19.3

Robin

19

Michele

18.3

Steph

17.9

Addy

17.9

Natalie

17.1

Brenda

16.5

Diane

16.1

Kirti

14.8

Cyndy

14.4

Max

12.8

Cathy

10.8

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Bench Press [(3 sets x 5 reps x wt)/BMI]

Name

Index

Dan

129

Ryan C

125

Nate

124.5

Bill C

118.3

Jeff B

117

Matt

115.8

Tod W

112.8

Jon

112.4

Gary

105.9

Chris K

104.7

Eddie

103.8

Scott G

102.4

Evan

98.6

Chris G

97.7

Todd R

91.1

Audrey

85.9

Chris A

85.4

Lew

85.2

Greg

83

Bill G

80.2

Mark

80

Cindy

78.2

Misty

65.5

Danae

65.1

Robbie

64.8

Kishore

64.5

Tia

64.5

Bob

64

Marlene

63.3

Teri

62.7

Sue

60.4

Robin

60

Michele

59.4

Steph

58.4

Max

57.4

Eric

56.8

Scott W

56.5

Kristy

56.3

Jackie

54.3

Natalie

53.6

Cathy

52.6

Heidi

51.1

Addy

48.1

Brenda

44.8

Tara

38.4

Trese

32.8

Irene

31.5

Bonnie

30.5

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Vitamin D deficiency is often associated with decreased calcium absorption in the gut and impaired bone metabolism. However, Vit D deficiency has been linked to increased risk of death from heart disease, cognitive impairment in older adults, asthma in children and certain cancers. It may also play a role in high blood pressure and diabetes. Ultimately, Vit D deficiency occurs because of limited sun exposure (avoidance or use of > SPF 8 sunscreen), inadequate dietary intake or absorption, and significant liver or kidney disease.

Because cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in developed countries, affecting over 5 million adults in the US, and recent evidence suggests that development of CAD is in varying degrees an inevitable function of the aging process, maintaining normal Vit D status is imperative. Every year over 900,000 Americans experience a heart attack (MI), about 65% are first time heart attacks. Often times the survivors of MIs develop and die prematurely from heart failure due to the negative effects of an MI on heart’s ability to pump blood.

A recent study by Bae et al. in animals has shown that Vit D deficiency accelerates the progression of heart failure following an MI, while normal Vit D status was protective. Much is yet unknown about the interactions of Vit D and various disease processes, but given the prevalence of heart disease in developing countries, and the surprising high number of Vit D deficiencies in otherwise healthy people, a simple blood test for Vit D status (25 OH) by your doctor during your routine physical exam may be a good idea, especially if you have one or more known risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Vit D supplementation is simple and inexpensive, but excess consumption is toxic. To know whether or not you have a deficiency, get tested and consult with your physician before taking supplemental Vit D. 

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Bar Push Presses [(5 reps x 3 sets x wt)/BMI]

Name

Index

Dan

87

Matt

83.3

Gary

83

Tod W

77.8

Chris G

73.1

Kathy

72

Todd R

69.2

Mark

69

Audrey

68.4

Chris A

66.5

Cindy

65

Shawn

59.4

Lew

58

Teri

56.7

Tia

52

Kishore

46.1

Misty

43.8

Steph

43.8

Jami

43.3

Heidi

41.6

Judy

39.8

Max

38.3

Cyndy

37.3

Tara

35.7

Veronica

34.9

Robbie

31.3

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"Spring is upon us and drama is in the air!"

The days are getting longer, Robins are chirping, the air is fresh and it is only 3 weeks until the long awaited, get-a-way to the beach Spring Break. Oh the excitement! Head off to the tanning salon for a dose of melanoma primer and then to Victoria’s Secret for the hottest swimsuit design. All is well until the dressing room and then…..Oh my……the Amygdala (the part of the brain that processes emotions) starts taking up glucose for energy like a world class sprinter’s quads during a 400 meter event. There is a reason why Secret is part of the name you know, it’s what’s been hiding under the Winter coat since the feeding season began in late November, not to mention the perfectly timed, pre-Spring Break, boxes of Girl Scout muffin top makers.

Oh what to do, blood sugar is dropping because the Amygdala is in warp drive, Scotty we need more glucose, OK Captain here’s more cookies from the Klingons, Ahhhh thanks Captain I feel better.

Next, the mobile device takes a hit. The battery goes dead because of the panic search for something on-line that will fix the physique in 3 weeks. Run to the car, plug in the phone, make sure it’s running or the car battery will die as well.

A colon cleanse, a no carb diet, freeze dried deer antler tablets, Ohhhhhhhh.... search all the skinny girl sites, they are thin all the time, they MUST have the Secret that goes with Victoria! Wait a minute, maybe I should email my trainer, no, no, no, he’s the antithesis of fad diets and quick fixes, an idiot with a Ph.D, I need someone who knows how to fix this mess quick. He’ll tell me I should have been consistent with training, kept my weight gain under 5 lbs during the feeding season and thought about Spring Break on January 2nd, Ahhhhhhhhh I don’t want to hear that! Somebody give me a hug and tell me what I want to hear damn it, I’ll pay anything for it, just make me look skinnier in 3 weeks. I know tan fat looks better than white fat but I’m tan and I still “think” I look fat. Help!!!!!

When I was young my dad was installing paneling in our basement, I wanted to help drive nails. He said no I’d smash my finger, I insisted, he handed me the hammer. About the 3rd nail in I smashed my finger. My mother came running down stairs as I was screaming about my bloody finger, asked my dad why he let me nail, he said because I insisted.

A friendly reminder, there are no easy solutions. The internet hucksters would like you to think so, but they just want your money in exchange for a short term fix to bring your Amygdala out of warp drive. My advice (see above) or try what you think will work, I’ll know in about 3 days during a WOD who’s been naughty and who’s been wise. Email me if you want a hammer, I can send you one from the physique diet days archive but be warned, what it really takes to get lean is not easy nor is there a quick fix.

 

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